Thursday, December 13, 2012

New Testament Greek And Structural Analysis

Have you ever wondered how to do a structural analysis of a passage in the Greek New Testament? Ever wished you could just watch someone do one right in front of you? How about this... Have you ever wondered how you could do one on your laptop or PC? Well, in this tutorial I'll show you how to do a structural analysis using Philippians 1:27-28a.

There is no one way to do a structural analysis. Some are more complicated; some are simplified. I think the goal is two-fold: (1) You want a system that you will use, which, in one sense, means that it cannot take 3 hours to do; and (2) you want a system that helps you show the relationship of the main ideas of the text.

*I'm getting better talking into a camera without a live audience. It's pretty hard, to be honest. Thanks for your patience as I continue to improve. I really hope that these resources will be helpful to you!


7 comments:

  1. Another good resource on this type of exegetical work is Text-Driven Preaching, particularly chapters 5 and 6.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tom, thanks for referring us to that great resource. You're right! What do you aim for when you are doing your structural analysis?

      Delete
  2. Similar to you and to how Text-Driven Preaching lays it out, I look for the finite verb and independent clause first, then place the subordinate and dependent clauses underneath. This helps to understand the author's primary point and how he supports it.

    In longer Greek sentences (e.g. Eph 2:1-7) it gets a bit tricky to place all the dependent clauses correctly, but if done correctly it is very helpful in tracing Paul's argument (see also Schreiner on this).

    Once the structural analysis is completed, you usually have a clear exegetical outline in front of you, including main points and sub-points. And, the outline is based on the text itself!

    I'm not exaggerating when I say that learning SA transformed my exegetical sermon prep.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tom!!!! You are so right, brother. Having this discipline in my exegetical tool belt transformed my preparation and teaching as well. And, I think you would agree...It is a discipline that gets easier and easier the more you do it (just like anything else).

      Delete
    2. Agreed. I've also found chapter 6 of Schreiner's Interpreting the Pauline Epistles helpful. However, this process is more cumbersome than straight SA.

      Delete
    3. Tom, what do you think would be another helpful "tutorial" video to do in the future? I would really appreciate your input for some ideas! Thanks, brother!

      Delete
    4. Following the steps from SA to exegetical outline to homeletical outline is always helpful to see.

      Delete